MATTERHORN

Thomas Russell Wingate  
19 April 2013  

 

                   1

Salt Lake City is in a desert. From 1847 onward, parks and gardens have been important here.

                   2

The International Peace Gardens inside Jordan Park (1000 South 900 West) were built by committees over many years.

Here I list the honored countries alphabetically, with dates where available.

U.S.A. 1947 / Brazil 1977 / Canada 1971 / China 1959 / Denmark 1955 / England 1963 / Ethiopia (for Africa) 1976 / Finland 1961 / France 1999 / Germany 1983 / Greece / Holland 1955 / India 1966 / Ireland 1989 / Italy 1965 / Japan 1950 / Lebanon early 1950s / Korea 1985 / Mexico / Norway 1972 / Philippines 1975 / Russia 1987 / Scotland / Sweden 1955 / Switzerland 1965 / Tonga 2000 / Vietnam 1989 / Wales 1971

Flowers, trees, bushes, ponds, bridges, sculptures, flagpoles, entranceways—all provide an authentic whiff of the designated nation.

It is all dignified and restful. Weddings are held here. 

                   3

In my well-traveled youth I visited Switzerland. The Matterhorn, iconic enough for Disneyland, got into my imagination. (It appears under its French name, le Cervin, in my novels.) I saw it from a dangerous road. I do not recommend driving across the Alps.

A large photograph of the Matterhorn was on my mother’s walls for nearly fifty years.

Partly for that reason, my families held her memorial service in these gardens in 2009.

                   4

The Swiss Garden contains a five-story replica of the Matterhorn.

You can see it behind our hats. (Tricorns are out of fashion.)

We pose on its anniversary to honor what Emerson called “the shot heard round the world.”¹
 
The citizens of Switzerland are famously armed and determined to stay so.

The citizens of Switzerland are free and determined to remain so.

Let Americans resolutely “secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.”

No one else will do it for us—or for them.²

                   5

 

 

 

Matterhorn Hats

 

 

 

NOTES

 

1 See “Patriots’ Day” in Wikipedia.
2 See Mother Country 2 and Bits of English II 6 on website. See also
   Kipling’s poem “The Old Issue.”

 



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